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Posts Tagged ‘brain injury rehab’

Brain Injury Awareness

Brain Injury Awareness Month – 2017

It’s All About Resources

Every March, Brain Injury Awareness Month, led by the Brain Injury Association of America, kicks into high gear to educate the public on this major public health crisis. From concussion and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) to severe brain injury and stroke; all of these conditions have a far-reaching impact. An impact on the individual who has suffered the injury, families and caregivers, communities, and our ever-burdened health care system.

The greatest challenge for those affected by these unfortunate, and often preventable, events is access to resources. Educational and treatment resources beyond the initial stage of injury is often hard to come by and folks are left to their own devices to put the pieces together for the most productive life possible. This, while being told by so many (including their doctors and family) that there is not much hope for further recovery.

Where to Look For Answers

What follows are links to a host of resources exploring many aspects of brain injury. Content related to understanding why so many continue to experience the symptoms they do. Some resources will explain symptoms in detail and why they occur, and others will look into what tests you can have done to determine what path of treatment is best for you. Most importantly, these resources demonstrate a clear message of hope for so many to get beyond their daily struggles. Be sure to watch the videos of those who have done just that!

We understand that those who have injured their brain digest information in different ways, therefore the content is made available in written (blog), audio (podcast), and video formats. Please enjoy, learn something, act on something; and pass the Brain Injury Awareness word on to others who can benefit and renew their hope.

Brain Injury Awareness Links

 

Concussion Frustration: 7 Reasons Your Doctor Doesn’t Listen to You (And, What to Do About It)

As the Old Saying Goes…

…If I had a dime for every time someone with concussion said “my doctor doesn’t listen to me”. Nearly every day in clinical practice patients report to me one way or another this very real concern. While this is true across all areas of specialty at our center, it is far more prevalent in those suffering the effects of concussion and post-concussion syndrome.

There are several theories as to why many doctors don’t take the time to listen. These can be explored at length with a simple internet search. Here, I will briefly explore some of these more accepted views and, more importantly, what I have come to see is the real truth behind why so many are being ignored, and in many cases dismissed, by their ‘trusted’ health care providers.

The Usual Suspects

  • Time. Most primary care physicians are pressured by the demands of heavy patient loads and declining insurance reimbursements. That leaves you as the patient at the mercy of a provider that may only give you one minute or less to voice your concerns; which for those of you with concussion are often too many to list.
  • Distraction. Electronic records, insurance forms, mobile devices, and excessive patient volume can cause doctors to get caught up in things that are not right in front of them. That is you, the patient. If a doctor is distracted, they will not do a great job at listening.
  • Bias. It has been established that many doctors will spend less time with individuals based on race, gender, and other factors such as socio-economic status. Also, patients that come in with recurring complaints are more likely to be dismissed or ignored.

While I believe these are accurate (although unacceptable) reasons for many being short-changed when it comes to their health care provider’s attention; there are more specific reasons doctors don’t listen when it comes to the laundry list of life struggles that can accompany concussion and post-concussion syndrome.

 The Real Story Doctors Don’t Listen to Those With Concussion

  • Ignorance. This may seem like a harsh term to many (particularly the doctors), although it simply means that most primary care providers lack the knowledge and information necessary to properly question and screen for these types of conditions.
  • Invisible. Concussions are not seen on CT scans or found in blood work. They are silent injuries that result in functional problems with balance, vision, cognitive abilities, and more. Conventional medical approaches are not well suited for these conditions; therefore, doctors are less inclined to listen to problems they cannot treat.  
  • Overwhelming. The number of symptoms and conditions that can result from a hit to the head are staggering (we’ve compiled a list of over 50!). Most doctors when presented with 5, 10, or more complaints may focus only on 1 or 2 as this is what they are accustomed to.
  • Unknown. Even with all the attention given to concussion over the past several years in sports, the media, and movies, this is still uncharted territory for most providers in mainstream medicine. This is also true for many of the doctors those with concussion are being referred to.

So, What’s the Answer?

The internet is full of strategies to get your provider to listen better. This, however, is not the focus of this article. And, it will not serve you well to try and get those that don’t understand concussion to listen to you! What you need to do is seek out the services of a qualified functional neurologist who is well versed in the art of listening. And, who understands the multitude of symptoms those with concussion and post-concussion syndrome experience. Only then will you be able to get answers as to what the best method of treatment will be for you. Concussions are real, and so are the symptoms and solutions!

Resources

For more information please call us at 828.708.5274, or visit any of the following resources:

A Pilot’s Success Story with Brain Training

ear anatomyJohn’s Story

John is a 66-year-old grandfather and successful businessman from Asheville, NC who plays tennis and counts flying among his favorite hobbies. But he is concerned that his memory is starting to slip. There’s no family history of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

John, however, did have a car accident and subsequent skiing accident in which the fall he suffered was so serious that his helmet broke. He also admits that he is often dizzy, fatigued, easily angered, and frustrated over his physical and mental limitations.

Intervention for balance and cognitive decline

John underwent comprehensive Brain Training at a frequency of three times per day over the course of five days. His brain function was carefully monitored throughout the training process with measurement of EEG brainwaves, vital signs, eye movements, balance, mental and physical timing, and more to ensure he was receiving the proper amount of therapy without exceeding fatigue limits that might promote worsening of his symptoms as is often the case in more conventional rehabilitation programs.

Understanding the relationship between physical functions such as balance, timing and eye movements and higher cognitive functions like memory (both major challenges in his case), we implemented the following Brain Training procedures: EEG neurofeedback, Interactive Metronome, vestibular rehabilitation, metabolic/nutritional therapies, eye movement and neurological rehabilitation, electrical stimulation, breathing exercises, lifestyle changes and home care therapies.

Outcomes with Brain Training

John reported midway through his five-day training program that he had “one of his best games of tennis.” He also said he felt less dizzy and improvements in his mood and memory were noticeable to him and others. “I walk better, talk better and feel better,” he said.

Actual measurable, objective improvements recorded with post-intensive diagnostic testing included:

  • Interactive Metronome (Timing): 14% improvement in timing accuracy and normalization of hyper-anticipatory timing tendency with motor tasks (i.e. becoming more ‘in-sync’ with a specified reference tone).
  • Videonystagmography (Eye movements): Significant improvements in numerous aspects of oculomotor functionality including: gaze holding, slow and fast eye movements, optokinetic responses, and spontaneous/involuntary eye movements.
  • Computerized Assessment of Postural Stability (Balance): 24% improvement in balance under the most challenging circumstances (eyes closed on an unstable surface – noted as PSEC on charts below below). Near complete normalization of a hazardous posterior center of pressure (tendency to carry his body or sway to the rear):

Pilot 1

Pilot 2

Implications Following Treatment

After his treatment was completed, John says he was able to recapture the moments of joy and sense of accomplishment he experienced through playing tennis and flying his aircraft, his two favorite hobbies; as well as being more engaged with his family.

He reports his memory has improved, he has fewer symptoms of dizziness and fatigue, and most important – he is now a safer, happier pilot following his specific Brain Training program.

Case Study: Post-Concussion Syndrome – Jackie

concussion ep 43Jackie’s Story

At the time of presentation to APEX Brain centers in Asheville, NC in late 2015, Jackie was a 55-year-old, soon to be retired professional female. Post-concussive symptoms of debilitating headaches, memory loss, learning and behavioral issues, fluctuations in heart rate, and difficulty handling visual stimulation such as driving, busy public places and computer screens were preventing her from leading a normal life. Prior to traveling to APEX from Charlotte, NC, Jackie had sought care from several different doctors in her area. Vestibular therapy and chiropractic care had given her some relief of symptoms, although her other experiences were not so positive. At one point a provider told her that she was mentally ill. Jackie was outraged and, as many with post-concussion syndrome report similarly, she offered this statement: “I’m not crazy. I didn’t have any of these symptoms before I had the injury and I am definitely not making them up”. This is the unfortunate reality of many who suffer with brain injury.   

Intervention for balance and cognitive decline

Jackie underwent comprehensive Brain Training at a frequency of 3 times per day over the course of 15 days (with 2 days off between each week for much needed rest and recovery). Her brain function was carefully monitored throughout the training process with measurement of EEG brainwaves, vital signs, eye movements, balance, mental and physical timing, and more to ensure she was receiving the proper amount of therapy to be effective without exceeding fatigue limits that could potentially promote worsening of her symptoms. Modalities implemented included, but were not limited to: neurofeedback, Interactive Metronome, vestibular rehabilitation, metabolic/nutritional therapies, eye movement and neurological rehabilitation, electrical stimulation, breathing exercises and home care therapies.

Outcomes after Brain Training

Jackie reported prior to brain training that she would have a constant headache of 6 on a 0-10 scale (0 being no pain and 10 being the worst possible pain) that would escalate into an 8-9 of 10 by the end of the day. The week after her program she reported the headaches were finally manageable at a level of 3-4 of 10 and would not escalate. Jackie has had continued success and reported at 3 weeks after her program that she is headache free, unless she spends too much time in front of a screen or in a busy public place. She also reports that when this occurs, her ‘at home’ brain exercises will relieve them. Aside from headaches, Jackie has reported that she no longer feels like she is in a constant brain fog. Her heart rate has also normalized and no longer fluctuates or spikes. 

Actual, measurable objective improvements recorded with post-intensive diagnostic testing include, but are not limited to:

  • Cognitive Testing: Jackie showed an increase in her Neurocognition Index of 11%. This is a standardized overall score of cognitive performance. Significant improvements in specific areas of memory (one of her biggest concerns) are as follows: 65% in composite memory, 33% in verbal memory, and 67% in visual memory.
  • Interactive Metronome: 56% improvement in motor timing accuracy and normalization of hyper-anticipatory timing tendency with motor tasks (i.e. premature response to a specified reference tone).
  • Videonystagmography (VNG): Significant improvements in numerous aspects of oculomotor (eye movement) functionality including: gaze holding, slow and fast eye movements, optokinetic responses, and spontaneous/involuntary eye movements.

Implications for others:

Diagnostic and functional tests can be used to direct an effective Brain Training program and improve post-concussion symptoms. Increased sensory and environmental sensitivities are common symptoms of post-concussion syndrome. There are several areas of your brain that process information from your environment and from your body. If these areas are damaged then it becomes difficult for the brain to process sensory input, resulting in fogginess, memory and cognitive issues, impaired processing of pain, and the many other symptoms seen after concussions. The frustration felt by individuals being made to feel they are “crazy”, as Jackie noted, is entirely unnecessary and driven by a health care system that is largely focused on diagnostic testing and lacking significantly in functional treatment options. There is great hope for partial and full recovery in most cases of concussion given a thorough investigation and functional interventions addressing the physical, cognitive, metabolic and lifestyle factors that influence brain health.

If you or someone you care about is experiencing ANY of these symptoms, or anything out of the ordinary related to a head or brain injury, call APEX Brain Centers now at 828.708.5274. You may also email us at [email protected] for more information and to set up a free consultation. 

Case Study: Young Mother With Multiple Concussions Finds Relief Through Brain Training

Ali’s Story

Ali presented to APEX Brain Centers in August of 2015 in search of concussion relief. She was struggling with a host of debilitating complaints due to multiple head injuries and concussions over the years. Headaches, brain fog, memory loss, anxiety, emotional distress, restless legs, tightness in the chest, tingling in her limbs, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), dizziness, spatial awareness difficulties, loss of muscle mass and hair, gastrointestinal (GI) difficulties and more were all part of her normal daily experience. She was in a constant search for concussion relief. She had been to a host of specialists with limited outcomes; including osteopaths, naturopaths, ENTs, cardiologists, allergists, chiropractors, physical therapists, acupuncturists and massage therapists. She was an exceptional student and athlete prior to her injuries.

Ali traveled from Virginia to seek care at APEX Brain Centers in Asheville, NC in late August, 2015 on referral from a friend who had similar problems with exceptional outcomes at APEX. She underwent an intensive course of Brain Training where she was admitted into in an individualized program directed by extensive diagnostic testing, and led by clinicians highly experienced in functional neurology and functional medicine. What follows is a sampling of some of the cutting-edge clinical interventions and amazing functional gains Ali experienced during her time at APEX.

Intervention for Concussion Relief

Ali underwent comprehensive Brain Training at a frequency of 3 times per day over the course of 10 days (with 2 days off between each week for much needed rest and recovery). Her brain function was carefully monitored throughout the training process with measurement of EEG brainwaves, vital signs (particularly important in those with POTS), eye movements, balance, mental and physical timing, and more to ensure she was receiving the proper amount therapy to be effective; but not too much so as to reproduce/amplify symptoms. Laboratory tests were ordered to evaluate for suspected food reactivity, markers of inflammation, altered stress responses and amino acid insufficiencies; among other factors. Modalities implemented included, but were not limited to: neurofeedback (NFB), Interactive Metronome, vestibular rehabilitation, metabolic/nutritional therapies, eye movement and neurological rehabilitation, whole body vibration, electrical stimulation, cognitive training, breathing exercises and home care protocols.

Ali’s Outcomes after Brain Training

Subsequent to her initial Brain Training program, Ali reported subjective improvements in all areas of pre-intensive complaint. What follows are a sampling of Ali’s words describing outcomes in several of these areas:

  • My heart rate is down significantly and I have fewer palpitations
  • I rarely feel unbalanced anymore
  • The tingling in my hands and feet is gone
  • Brain Training has greatly decreased my widespread pain
  • Since leaving APEX I have only had a few minor headaches, and none that have turned into a migraine
  • Now I can really engage with my children for long periods of time
  • My emotions are on a more even keel
  • I can recover from a workout and exercise again the next day
  • My immune function is improved
  • I expect all of my capabilities to return and even excel beyond what they used to be in light of the new and better lifestyle I’ve adapted!

Measurable Changes

  • Cognitive Testing: Increase in her Neurocognition Index of 13%, which is a standardized overall measurement of cognitive performance. Executive function (reasoning) scores were improved by 35%. Increases in various aspects of memory, attention, processing speed and more were as high as 13%.
  • Interactive Metronome: 43% improvement in task average with motor timing and 15% improvement in  hyper-anticipatory timing tendency with motor tasks (i.e. responding prior to a pre-set reference tone).
  • Computerized Assessment of Postural Stability (CAPS): 8.2% improvement in balance on an unstable surface with eyes closed; which brought her from a moderate to mild reduction in balance compared to her age and gender matched peers.
  • Videonystagmography (VNG): Significant improvements in numerous aspects of oculomotor (eye movement) functionality including: gaze holding, slow and fast eye movements, optokinetic responses, and spontaneous/involuntary eye movements.

It should be noted that due to the overwhelming success of her first program Ali returned for a second intensive Brain Training program in November of 2015. She experienced further objective and subjective benefit and continues to update us on her progress.

Concussion Relief IS Possible

An alarming number of individuals do not seeking care for head injuries. It is important to recognize the symptoms of these debilitating injuries and that something can be done about them. The ‘wait and see’ approach to concussion and mild traumatic brain injury is no longer acceptable. Early intervention is key! The longer one waits, the more difficult it is to recover and have full engagement with life!

If you or someone you love is experiencing ANY of these symptoms, call APEX now at 828.708.5274. You may also email us at [email protected] for more information, or to set up a free consultation. 

Boot Camp for Your Brain?

03E08469[1]Google defines ‘boot camp’ as: a short, intensive, and rigorous course of training. Aside from the obvious military style boot camp, many are seeking out boot camps in all shapes and sizes to help with everything from fitness to addiction.

Why not boot camp for your brain???

A basic understanding of how the brain works will help you realize that a boot camp is the most effective way to train your brain. From those with neurological issues, to those looking to elevate their level of performance to new heights, a well-trained brain will help ensure you are functioning at your highest possible level (both physically and mentally).

Neuron Theory, 101

Your brain’s sole purpose in life is to receive and transmit information. Sensory information from the environment and your body travels up to your brain to be processed; and thoughts, actions, hormone circulation and more are the end result of that input. The brain receives and transmits information through neurons (nerve cells), more specifically networks of neurons, in the brain and body. The more powerful the information traveling in those networks, or pathways, the stronger they become. In short, from a theory developed in the mid-20th century by the psychologist, Donald Hebb: cells that fire together, wire together!

What determines if cells get ‘wired’ together is the intensity and frequency of the stimulation delivered to them. There can be equal parts frequency and intensity, or more of one or the other. Using the example of learning how to play a guitar; one can play 10 minutes per day, 5 days per week – representing moderate frequency and low intensity – and could expect slow gains in the ability to play guitar. The same individual could participate in a ‘guitar boot camp’ playing for 1-2 hours, 3-5 times per day, for 5 days – very high frequency AND intensity – and expect to make much larger gains in their skills on 6 strings.

Now, About that Brain Boot Camp

Paying respect to the understanding that cells that fire together, wire together, it should now make good sense that training of brain function would yield the greatest outcomes in this high frequency, high intensity boot camp model. Every brain is different and unique, and faced with its own sets of strengths and challenges; and the frequency and intensity of individual aspects of Brain Training can be adapted to fit these unique needs.

Another added benefit of the boot camp training model is that of fitting a great deal of learning into a very short period of time. Moms and dads, sons and daughters, athletes and CEOs, brain injured and infirmed – time is a valuable commodity, and to compress months (if not years) of benefit and improved quality of life into a 5, 10, or 15 day period of time is something most folks could not put a price tag on. Further, the longer we wait (and the longer it takes) to train our brains, the less benefit we will gain from the experience.

To learn more about our Asheville, NC based Brain Boot Camps for learning and behavioral issues, peak performance, concussion and brain injury, and more; contact us at 828.708.5274 for a FREE 15 minute consultation.

Case Study: Mild Traumatic Brain Injury – Liz

Liz’s Story

Liz is a 29-year-old female entrepreneur, designer, and athlete who came to APEX Brain Centers with a history of post-concussion syndrome from previous car accidents and sport related head injuries. She reported symptoms that are often seen in cases of mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) including brain fog, fluctuating and elevated heart rate, fatigue, incoordination, excessive emotionality, sharp head pains, and decreasing ability to think critically and effectively. Liz’s symptoms have been nothing short of debilitating and have taken away her ability to work full time at the career she loves. She was also very concerned that her future plans of having a baby and starting a family would be compromised due to the health risk to both her and a developing fetus.

Liz traveled from Virginia to the APEX Brain Centers office in Asheville, NC to participate in our targeted, high frequency, high intensity Brain Training program. She began a 10-day course of Brain Training in November of 2014 with a goal of alleviating her concussion related symptoms. With her sincere efforts and dedication to recovery, we were able to record significant measurable changes related to her symptomatology.

Intervention for mTBI

Liz underwent Brain Training 3 times per day over the course of the 10-day period. Her brain function was carefully monitored throughout the training process to ensure she was receiving enough treatment to be effective, but not too much so as to be counter-productive. Modalities delivered included, but were not limited to: neurofeedback (NFB) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), Interactive Metronome, vestibular rehabilitation, metabolic/nutritional therapies, eye movement and other aspects of neurological rehabilitation, electrical stimulation, breathing exercises and home care recommendations.

Outcomes after Brain Training

Subsequent to her Brain Training program, Liz reported significant subjective improvements in the vast majority of her post-concussion syndrome symptoms including: fogginess and “wandering” of thought, fluctuating heat rate, ability to control emotions, head pain, sleep, intensity at which she was able to exercise, balance, and levels of energy.

Actual, measurable objective improvements recorded with post-intensive diagnostic testing include:

  • Cognitive Testing: Improvements in 4 aspects of memory, attention, executive and other cognitive functions ranging from 14% – 800%.
  • Interactive Metronome: 42% improvement and normalization of hyper-anticipatory timing tendency with motor tasks. 68% improvement in task average with motor skills. 30% improvement in overall response accuracy with motor skills.
  • Computerized Assessment of Postural Stability (CAPS): Elimination of mild reductions in stability with balance and complete normalization of balance abilities in eyes closed scenarios.
  • Videonystagmography (VNG): Significant improvements in numerous aspects of oculomotor (eye movement) functionality including: gaze holding, slow and fast eye movements, optokinetic responses, and spontaneous/involuntary eye movements.
  • Quantitative EEG (qEEG): Normalization of depressed 0-10Hz bandwidth activity.
  • Autonomic Testing: Stabilization of heart rate from an erratic range of 90-150 bpm, to 60-90 bpm; saving her over 30 million heartbeats per year!

With an ever-increasing number of individuals experiencing mTBI, it is important to recognize the symptoms of these oftentimes debilitating disorders and, more importantly, that something can be done about them. Borrowing a phrase from the Brain Injury Association of America, “Brain injury is the last thing on your mind, until it is the only thing on your mind”!

Moving Beyond the Wait and See Approach to Concussions

A young soccer player, a third grade girl I’ll call Annabelle, came to see me seeking relief from disabling eye pain, lack of visual focus, depression, and anxiety. Annabelle had been living with these symptoms for quite some time, ever since she suffered a mild blow to her head during a game. After the injury her family took her for treatment immediately, and she was diagnosed with a concussion. The physician who saw her told her family to “wait out” the symptoms. So they waited. And waited. The longer Annabelle waited, the worse her symptoms seemed to get. Annabelle had to give up soccer, and started missing an extraordinary amount of school. In my practice I see head injury victims like Annabelle, and the long-term effects of the “wait and see” approach to concussions all too often.

Concussions are one of the greatest concerns for young athletes in this country today. One quarter of a million young people visit emergency rooms every year to seek treatment for sport or recreation related brain injuries, according to the Center for Disease Control. It is thought that many more concussions go untreated because of lack of awareness about the dangers of head injuries. Research into the problem suggests other reasons why concussions go unreported. A study conducted by The Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council concluded that there is a “culture of resistance” among athletes to report concussion symptoms. Many young sports players, their coaches, and families take the wait and see approach. Annabelle’s story demonstrates that many health care practitioners do the same.

The White House Concussion Summit

Recently, President Obama hosted the first ever White House Healthy Kids and Safe Sports Concussion Summit to spread awareness of brain injury prevention and offer resources to recognize and appropriately respond to concussions in young people. After the event, the White House released a fact sheet on sports related concussions aimed at young athletes and their families. What is most striking to me in this release is the continued realization that there are significant gaps in concussion research knowledge, and the statement of, “The truth is we still do not know enough about the consequences of traumatic brain injuries, (whether) it’s a hard knock on the playing field or head injury sustained by one of our troops serving abroad.”

I have personally observed the consequences of mild to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in clinical practice for nearly 15 years now, and this perceived lack of understanding of the consequences, in my humble opinion, is the primary reason for the general apathy and “sit and wait” approach most follow when it comes to dealing with mild brain injury or concussion. The greater issue, which is suggested in the White House release from the summit, is the need for better education for and coordination between athletes, parents, coaches, educators, providers, and other stakeholders.

The White House concussion summit offered a lot of reasons for hope, including new research that is being funded by the NCAA, the NFL, and many educational, governmental and non-profit institutions. While it’s encouraging that communication barriers are being broken down and much needed research and guidelines are being assembled, the truth is that today’s young athletes could be receiving much better and swifter care for concussion injuries. There are already effective methods for dealing with brain injuries that deserve more attention. The symptoms, objective markers and testing, treatment options, and long term dangers of concussion are in fact well understood by those clinicians dealing with brain injury on a regular basis.

A Different Approach to Concussion Injuries for Today’s Young Athletes

Functional neurologists are very likely the best equipped clinicians to deal with the ramifications of brain injury in youth, as they are well-versed in function of motor, balance, eye movement, cognitive and emotional, autonomic, and other systems often impacted by blows to the head. They also have at their disposal diagnostic testing procedures to assess function in all of these areas and, most importantly, an exhaustive list of rehabilitative tools to effectively treat these potentially devastating injuries.

As a Functional Neurologist, I have a different approach to concussion. When Annabelle came into my office I did not tell her to “wait and see.” I gave her a full neurological evaluation and ran many other test regimens, including eye movement testing with videonystagmography. Her results revealed that the parts of her brain responsible for visual focus, object tracking, and balance were not performing functionally. Other problems were uncovered as well, including measurable challenges with sequencing and planning in the front part of her brain. After an intensive 5 day course of brain training specific for her measured deficits she returned to school, and was able to finish the rest of her school year without any further problems. She told me, “I am normal again.”

With greater education and awareness of treatment options available today, we can help young athletes like Annabelle get back on their feet, and back to enjoying the quality of life they deserve, without waiting a second longer!

5 Dangers of Untreated Concussions…

concussion ep 43No one is immune to the possibility of concussion; although athletes, children, senior citizens, and those with ‘high-risk’ jobs are much more likely to suffer head and brain injuries. No blow to the head should be taken lightly. The long-term effects of untreated concussions, under-treated concussions, or mistreated concussions can be wide ranging. The dysfunction caused by post-concussion syndrome can show up in many areas of life, including some areas you may not suspect. Here are 5 areas of life where a person with untreated concussion symptoms may struggle long after the injury has occurred:

  1. Academics:

    Student athletes who suffer concussions may be sidelined; not only from sports activities, but also from classes. It is not uncommon for students to miss weeks or even months of school while dealing with symptoms of concussion. Symptoms such as eye pain, blurred vision, memory loss, attention disorders, reading comprehension problems, and fatigue can make it nearly impossible for children and adolescents to focus and concentrate on schoolwork with any degree of success.

  2. Relationships:

    It can be difficult to cultivate or nurture meaningful relationships when you are dealing with long-term challenges caused by brain injury. Symptoms such as ‘brain fog’, chronic pain, and emotional dysregulation can damage relationships with family members, friends, and colleagues.

  3. Job performance:

    Focus, attention, coordination, and mental timing are significantly impaired with most head injuries. These problems can have a profound negative impact on job performance. Left untreated, or inappropriately treated, the effects of these injuries can be long lasting and often lead to decreased hours on the job, extended leaves of absence, demotions, further injury, and even termination of employment.

  4. Physical ability:

    Balance issues, vertigo, dizziness, headaches and other pain syndromes, heart rate irregularities, digestive issues, and even seizures are just some of the physical problems experienced by those with one or more concussions.

  5. Mental health:

    Mental illness and behavioral disorders including ADHD, anxiety, depression, phobias, PTSD, and addiction are often the end result for many with untreated head injuries. Stress and emotional turmoil, as well as long-term inflammatory responses and altered neurotransmitter function caused by head injury will very likely cause mental health challenges left untreated.

The bottom line is – you should always seek a thorough examination by a qualified practitioner after any head injury. There absolutely is hope for those suffering from the after-effects of concussions and post-concussion syndrome. Proper assessments and intervention strategies specific for your injury are the keys to improvement. For instance: quantitative EEG (qEEG) and neurofeedback,  vestibular and balance therapy, assessment and treatment of eye movement, and physical training modalities such as the Interactive Metronome, are just some of the strategies that, if applied appropriately, can help you reduce and even eliminate many of the challenges and symptoms listed above. At APEX Brain Centers we offer this hope through specific, comprehensive Brain Training for these treatable injuries.

Call us now at 828.708.5274 if you or a loved one has, or thinks they may have, suffered a concussion.

APEX Brain Centers is leading the way in neuroplasticity-based brain enhancement programs that are opening new doors for those struggling with addictions, learning and behavioral disabilities, test performance, athletic performance and more.

2 Walden Ridge Drive (STE 80) ~ Asheville, NC 28803 ~ 828.708.5274
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